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Full text of "APIC keynoter: news of the American Political Items"

APIC 



Hi, 




KEYNOTER 



NEWS OF THE AMERICAN POLITICAL ITEMS COLLECTORS 



VOLUME XI, Number 1 ISSUED FOUR TIMES YEARLY SPRING 1972 
\ 

THE 




DEMOCRATIC PARTY 
(Cleveland and Hendricks } 
4,911,017 
(219) 




REPUBLICAN PARTY 
(Blaine and Logan) 
4,848,334 
(182) 




GREENBACK (National) PARTY 
A ANTI MONOPOLY PARTY 
(Butler and West) 
133,825 4 42,545 



AMERI CAN PROHBI TION 
(Pomeroy and Conant) 




EQUAL RI GHTS PARTY 
(Look-wood And Stow) 



no vote no vote 

PROHIBITION PARTY 

(St. John and Daniel) 
151,809 



THE AMERICAN PARTY nominated Peter D. Wigginton but withdrew to support St. John and Daniel. 



APIC KEYNOTER ISSUED FOUR TIMES YEARLY BY APIC SPRING 1972 



STAFF t Editor, U. I. Chick Harris, #139, 6223 Mardel Ave., St. Louis, Missouri 63109. 
Assoo Editor, Jon D. Curtis, # 1438, 1141 Stevens St., West De Pere, Wiso. 54178. 

FEATURES : THE 1884 CAMPAIGN, Ernest M. Ureoh, PO Box 85, St. Charles, Missouri 63301. 

ANSWERING POSERS IRKING COLLECTORS, Web Haven, 324 Montioello Dr.N. , Syracuse NY 1320 
APIC CHAPTER NEWS, Ferd W. O'Brien, 1355 N. Sandburg Tr., Chicago, Illinois 60610. 
API COMMENTARY, Donald B. Coney, 66 Golf Street, Newington, Connecticut 06111. 
NO CROSS OF GOLD, Elmer A. Pieroy, Box 666, Victorville, California 92392. 
MINOR PARTY NE!S-1972jon D. Curtis, 1141 Stevens, West De Pere, Wisconsin 54178. 
CURRENT PUBLICATIONS, Robert C. Jaocaud, Box 73, North Thetford, Vermont 05054. 
POLITICAL SATIRE, Robert 0. Lowe, 119 Mill Street, Palmyra, New Y 0 rk 14522. 
KEYNOTER INDEX, Edward R. Jensen, 6640 N. Ottawa Ave., Chioago, 111. 60631. 

APIC OFFICERS : 

President , Gene F. MoGreevy, 1735 Jersey Ridge Road, Davenport, Iowa 52803. 

Vice Presidents : Region #1, Webster Haven, 324 Montioello Dr., Syracuse, NY 13205. 

Region #2, Stanley King, 261 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016. 
Region $3, Larry Krug, 505 S. Ardmore, Villa Park, 111. 60181. 
Region #4, Mrs. Lois Rathbone, 648 Fairfax, Denver, Colo. 80220. 
Region #5, John Fraser, 7427 Braeridge Way, Saoramento, Cal. 95831. 
Secretary-Treasurer , Donald B. Coney, 66 Golf St., Newington, Conn. 06111. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS : 
Joseph G. Brown, #95 J. Doyle DeWitt, #25 

Mrs. Marian Ford, #784 John C. Gibson, Sr. #240 Robert 0. Lowe, #174 
Edwin E. Puis, #53 Jerry D. Roe, #501 

APIC PAST-PRESIDENTS : 
Joseph W. Fuld (deoeasedj 1945-60 U. I. Chick Harris 1960-64 
Ferd W. O'Brien 1964-66 Robert Sterling 1966-68 Wayne G. LaPoe 1968-70 

THE PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN OF 1884 - see KEYNOTER cover and page 5 . 

Upon the assassination of President Garfield in 1881, Chester A. Arthur became President 
and astonished most of the politicians by advooating reforms and generally doing a fine 
job. He greatly disappointed his oronies and when the Republican Convention met in the 
summer of 1884, the nod went to the 'Plumbed Knight 1 , James G. Blaine of Maine. Other 

nominees were George F. Edmunds of Vermont and President Arthur The Democrats had 

been out of offioe for 24 years and felt optomistiq, for the divisions within the Repub- 
lican Party were deep and their candidate controversial. They ohose the young reformer, 
former mayor of Buffalo and the current governor of New York, Grover Cleveland over Tom 
F. Bayard of Delaware and Allen G. Thurman of Ohio. Thomas A. Hendrioks, the well known 
Indian! an, was the ohoioe for Vice President as it was felt he would help the ticket in 

the Republican mid-west The Anti -monopoly and Greenback Parties, advooating money 

reform, nominated the crafty former General and Massachusetts politician, Ben F. Butler 
with Absalom M. West of Mississippi. The American National Party merged with a group 
from the Prohibition Party and under the banner of the American Prohibition Party named 
Samuel C. Pomeroy and John A. Conant. The Prohibition Party named John P. St. John of 
Kansas and William Daniel of Maryland. Belva A. Lookwood, one of the leaders of the 
Women's Rights movement, was nominated for President on the Equal Rights ticket, with 
Marietta L. B. Stow as the ohoioe for Veep The campaign was undoubtedly the dirt- 
iest in history — the issues more mostly personal, rather than economic. Cleveland was ac- 
cused of fathering an illegitmate child, while Blaine's problems centered around charges 
of undue influence and manipulation. The race was very close — it took the statement of 
•Rum, Romanism and Rebellion 1 by a Blaine supporter and twenty five thousand votes in New 
York by Prohibitionist St. John to swing the State and the election to Cleveland. This was 
the Democrats first taste of victory since the three way race in 1856 gave Buchanan the nod. 



THE NEXT ISSUE WILL FEATURE THE 1960 CAMPAIGN — ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST SOLICITED. 



Donald Coney, upon his appointment as Secretary-Treasurer, asked to be relieved of his du- 
ties as KEYNOTER associate editor. Jon D. Curtis has agreed to serve — a big THANKS to both. 




I am very disheartened to inform you that, upon advice of legal counsel, we 
will not publish the list of APIC members who filed the "Affidavit of Compliance," 
because of possible violation of Federal Anti-Trust Laws. The Compliance Committee 
has been dissolved and they receive a vote of thanks for this work. I am parti- 
cularly grateful to the 49 members who filed the affidavit and thereby expressed 
their support of our position. Among those who filed the affidavit were many of 
the most respected names in our hobby and I am extremely sorry, after all our 
work and effort in this area, that we cannot carry this project to fruition, but 
I cannot subject our fine organization to possible jeopardy. I had personally 
felt, and it was shared by many, that the affidavit route was a good one and that 
it would have had the desired effect of helping to curb the "moneychangers," but 
it is not to be. Expressions of support of our stand came in from all parts of 
the country, including a complimentary editorial in Coin World as well as fine 
group support from the Connecticut and Colorado chapters of APIC. All I can say 
further on this subject is that we should be cautious and selective in our purchases 
of 1972 items, so that we add to our collections those items which enhance it. 
I am quite sure that since our reminders of caution many of our members are much 
more selective than previously. 

On February 9, per our Constitutional guidelines, I appointed the Nominating 
Committee to select the candidates for APIC Officers and Directors, to serve our 
National organization for the coming biennium. Sam Pressman - #2383 - Cleveland, 
Ohio, attorney, is the Chairman and Mac McGraw - #639 - Ft. Morgan, Colorado, 
public relations and Edward Gumprecht - #215 - Cheshire, Connecticut, traffic manager, 
are the other members of the committee. 

Don Coney - #202 - has taken over the duties of Secretary- Treasurer with dispatch 
and efficiency. We all owe him a big "Thank You" for filling this gap. 

The laborious task of Constitutional Revision has been completed by Lois Rathbone 
and her committee and you will be asked, shortly, to vote. I earnestly ask that you 
support the fine work of this committee by voting for the revision. Keep in mind, 
please, that a revision is different than amendments in that you must vote for the 
entire revision or against the entire revision. 

I am hoping that I get the opportunity to greet many of you, as well as visit 
with you, at our National Convention in August in Milwaukee. The National Convention 
is like no other APIC meeting in that you become an active part of "where all the 
major action is," so please make every effort to attend. You will be well rewarded 
in many ways. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 3 - SPRING 1972 



Answering Posers Irking Collectors 

By Webster Haven, #131 324 Monticello Drive N , Syracuse, N Y 13205 



Regarding the Taft First Voter buttons that were mentioned in the last issue 

of the Keynoter, Mrs. Enid Hafner (#2253) of Pocatello, Idaho, reports having 

an "Idaho First Voters Taft" button. Most seem to be from the Midwest and 
West. . .let's hear from you fellow Easterners. 

Q. I have a stick pin with a horizontal metal, partly shucked ear of corn with 
"CLARK" stamped across it. Can you tell me who this was for. 

A. I have never seen this item, but would hazard a guess that it might have been 
for Champ Clark, as he lived in the Corn Belt. Can any of the members shed 
any light on this one? 

Q. I recently acquired several papers. One is "Appeal to Reason," dated July 15, 
1916 and gives the 1916 Social Platform and condemns Capitalism and Militarism. 
The other is "The White Slave - Social Democratic Party," dated July 29, 1901. 
Do they have a monetary value, or perhaps they are just valuable to the 
historians. 

A. Those papers, of which you so kindly sent me the photographs and reproductions, 
are unquestionably political campaign items and should be preserved. Paper 
items have been ignored too long by some collectors of political campaign items. 
I, for one, feel that they are very important and that all types of campaign 
items have a monetary value in addition to their political significance. 

Q. Who was the youngest man elected President of the United States? 

A. This is a trick question. John F. Kennedy was 43 years and 236 days old when 
inaugurated and 43 years and 163 days old when elected. Teddy Roosevelt was 
only 42 years and 322 days old when he succeeded to the Presidency. But 
remember Roosevelt had been elected Vice President. He was not elected Presi- 
dent until 1904; he was then a few days over 46 years of age. 

Q. There has been a great deal of talk of running as Third Party Candidates by 
both George Wallace and Eugene McCarthy, if they do not obtain the Democratic 
Party's nomination. Have Third Parties really much chance of winning and 
enacting their program? 

A. In the past some Third Party candidates have garnered considerable vote. For 
example, Teddy Roosevelt in 1912 and George Wallace in 1968. However, their 
shortcoming lies in the fact that the major parties can annex their platform 
and that they do not have sufficient organization and financing except in small 
areas. Furthermore, if they did win, they would not have enough votes in 
Congress to put over their platform. As Teddy, himself, put it - "There are 
no loaves or fishes." 



THE APIC EXTENDS SYMPATHY TO MRS. ERMA KAUFMAN UPON THE DEATH OF HER HUSBAND, 
OUR LONG TIME MEMBER, STANLEY KAUFMAN, #177. THOUGH PLAGUED BY ILL HEALTH, 
HE ATTENDED AND SPONSORED MANY MEETINGS OF THE KANSAS APIC CHAPTER. HE WAS 
TRULY AN ASSET TO OUR ORGANIZATION AND TO OUR HOBBY. We understand that Mrs. 
Kaufman, who shared her husbands interest in his collection, will continue 
collecting and has made application to join our ranks. WELCOME. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 4 - SPRING 1972 



^^^^^^ ^^jj^^^ 

The charge of dirty politics has often been ascribed to our quadrennial presiden- 
tial elections with little regard to its actual use. However, of all our elections, 
the 1884 contest came the closest to this dubious distinction. It was pictured as a 
struggle between the public immorality of James G. Blaine and the private immorality 
of Grover Cleveland, and after its conclusion public confidence in the American political 
system had been severely tested. 

The political season of 1884 opened calmly enough with the nomination of Benjamin F. 
Butler of Massachusetts as the presidential candidate of the Anti-Monopoly Party. His 
nomination was seconded two weeks later by the Greenback Party. General A. M. West of 
Mississippi was added as the Vice-Presidential candidate for the combined efforts of 
these two minor parties. The parties spoke generally of the need for government regula- 
tion, a planned economy, and the issuance of more currency. Unfortunately for the 
Greenbackers , political issues would be subservient to personal issues in this election 
and in this regard they were definitely handicapped. Butler, tainted by an unsavory 
political and military reputation, had little chance in the election and further lessened 
his hopes by attending the Democratic convention as a voting delegate. 

Other minor party candidates included Belva A. Lockwood of the District of Columbia 
and Marietta L. Stow of California for the Equal or Women's Rights Party. Mrs. Lockwood, 
who had earlier been the first woman to practice law before the Supreme Court, received 
negligible support in the elction. The Prohibition Party split its meager strength 
into two parties. In Chicago the American Prohibition Partv nominated Samuel C. Pomeroy 
of Kansas and John A. Conant of Connecticut while in Pittsburgh the more important 
National Prohibition Party nominated John St. John of Kansas and William Daniel of 
Maryland. St. John's candidacy proved to be important because many independent Republi- 
cans dissatisfied with the candidates of the two major parties cast protest ballots for 
him in the general election. 

Of the two major parties, the Republicans met first in Chicago on June 3rd. The 
convention turned into a contest between the Stalwart faction, the party regulars and 
reform minded Pepublicans, sometimes derisively called Mugwumps. At first it had 
appeared a coalition of Republicans would deny Blaine his chance for the presidency, as 
it had in 1876 and 1880. What occasioned this outbreak of hositility towards the charis- 
matic leader of the Republican Party? The answer lay in Blaine's past. 

James G. Blaine of Maine was one of America's most gifted orators. He combined his 
magnetic persuasiveness with personal charm to claim the position of Speaker of the House 
and later a Senatorship. However, despite his qualifications, Blaine had many weak- 
nesses. Among them was willingness to be manipulated by his business friends. In 
the 1870 's he had sponsored bills that favored railroad interests including the Little 
Rock and Fort Smith Railroad then headed by Warren Fisher. Unfortunately for Blaine, 
all his correspondence with Fisher had been preserved and was kept by James Mulligan, 
Fisher's bookkeeper. In 1876 a Congressional committee started an investigation of 
Blaine's improprieties and in an amazing series of audacious events, Blaine moved to 
squelch the investigation. He immediately rushed to a conference with Mulligan, where 
he begged him not to disclose the letters. Mulligan, relenting under pressure, gave 
Blaine most of the letters. Armed with the evidence, Blaine returned to Washington to 
give an impassioned speech defending his ethics. Using selected passages from the 
letters, his defense turned the tide and his conduct was officially exonerated. Though 
Blaine had recouped most of his political fortune, the taint of corruption prevented 
his nomination for the presidency in 1876. Furthermore, he was denied the Republican 
nomination in 1880 because of a deadlock between his Half-Breed faction of the Republi- 
can Party and the spoils system oriented Stalwart faction headed by Senator Roscoe 
Conkling of New York. Blaine has to wait four more years for a chance for the presi- 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 5 - SPRING 1972 



dency. However, his chanqes were considerably improved when James A. Garfield, the 
compromise Republican choice of 1880, was assassinated and a Stalwart leader, Chester 
A. Arthur, became President. Arthur antagonized all wings of the Republican Party with 
his choices for political office, thus leaving the way open for Blaine in 1884. James 
G. Blaine was a heavy favorite of the regulars. Blaine supporters suffered a temporary 
setback when anti-Blaine forces under the able command of Carl Schurz of Missouri 
elected their man, John R. Lynch, a promising black from Mississippi, as the Temporary 
Chairman of the convention. The reformers confidently backed George F. Edmunds of 
Vermont, but the Stalwart faction refused to back Edmunds and the first ballot illus- 
trated the Mugwumps' weakness for Blaine had 334 1/2 votes, Arthur 278 votes and 
Edmunds 93 votes. Since the Mugwumps would not support Arthur, the results of the con- 
vention were a foregone conclusion. On the fourth ballot James G. Blaine received the 
coveted Republican nomination with John A. Logan of Illinois being quickly awarded 
the second spot. After the convention the disenchanted Mugwump faction looked to the 
Democrats for help. 

The jubilant Democrats also met in Chicago with their first chance for victory 
since before the Civil War. The favorite candidate was the honest and respectable 
Governor of New York, Grover Cleveland. Opposition to Cleveland came primarily from 
the Tammany Hall political machine of New York led by John Kelly. Kelly tried to 
divert strength to other regional candidates such as Thomas F. Bayard of Delaware and 
Allen Thurman of Ohio. Despite this opposition, Cleveland won the nomination on the 
second ballot. The repudiation of Tammany Hall was symbolized By Governor Edward S. 
Bragg of Wisconsin. He declared in a seconding speech for Cleveland, "They love him 
most for the enemies he has made." Then in a shrewd move the convention nominated the 
popular Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana as the Vice-Presidential candidate. Hopefully, 
Hendricks 1 nomination would help shatter the Republican grip on the Middle West. 

The nortly Grover Cleveland rose to the top spot of his party in a remarkably short 
time. Beginning as a lawyer in Buffalo, New York, Cleveland was elected mayor of his 
home town in 1881. Cleveland was known for his campaign to institute a policy of clean 
government in all facets of government. With his undeniable honesty as a trademark, 
Cleveland stunned political America with his election as governor of New York in 1882. 
During his two-year tenure as governor, Cleveland won many friends by his fight against 
the Tammany machine. By 1884 he had clearly taken the lead as the foremost of the young 
Democrats opposed to the political spoils system of the era. Now as the candidate of 
the generally united Democratic Party, Cleveland looked ahead with optimism to the 
campaign for the presidency. 

Unfortunately, the issues of the campaign were relegated to insignificance when 
on July 21, 1884, a Buffalo newspaper charged Cleveland with the seduction of a widow. 
Furthermore, this alleged seduction of Maria Halpin resulted in a child, and to compound 
the problem Cleveland had refused to marry her. The accusation startled Victorian 
America and when approached to defend his honor, Cleveland replied simply to his friends 
"Tell the truth." Cleveland's refusal to deny the story spread consternation in the 
Democratic ranks and joy in the Republican camp. Republican rallies trumpted the 
slogan "Ma! Ma J Where's my Pa? 

Gone to the White House. Ha! Ha! Ha!" 
Throughout the campaign ministers inveighed solemnly against Cleveland's moral laxity. 
Hounded by an indignant American reaction, Cleveland was further beset by charges of 
drunkeness, participation in lecherous orgies, and many other imagined sins. Cleve- 
land bore the brunt of these attacks with amazing self-control. He even tried to 
squash a story that purported to show that Blaine had married his wife after she was 
with child. 

Cleveland had personal troubles, but Blaine stood accused of public corruption. 
The ''Plumed Knight" of the Republican Party (a nickname given to him in the 1876 con- 
vention) was shocked by the disclosure of additional letters written to Warren Fisher 
in 1876. These letters clearly implicated Blaine in a deal to gain railroad rights- 
of-way. The Mulligan Letters, as they were called, Droved Blaine to be a blatant liar 
during the Congressional investigations of 1876. The Democrats gleefully taunted the 
Republicans with the slogan "Burn this letter! Bum this letter! Burn, burn oh burn 
this letter!" in an obvious reference to Blaine's injunction to James Mulligan to 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 6 - SPRING 1972 



THE 1884 CAMPAIGN , xontinued. 

destroy the evidence implicating him in the scandal. Another popular Democratic 
slogan was "Blaine! Blaine! James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the State of 
Maine!" in parody to the Republican, "Blaine! Blaine! James G. Blaine! The white plumed 
knight from the State of Maine"' The Republican hopes were further damaged by the emerg- 
ing art of political cartoonists. Thomas Nast, one of America's most famous cartoon- 
ists, pictured Blaine exposed before Republican leaders as a man tattooed with his 
past indiscretions. Clearly the Democrats were winning the war of the slogans. 

Despite all his past mistakes, Blaine saw the possibility of victory in the election 
if he could carry Cleveland's New York and he had reason for optimism. In New York, 
the influential Tammany machine betrayed the Democratic Party and worked actively for 
Blaine. Irishmen liked Blaine's anti-British stance and his family ties to Catholicism. 
(His mother was a Catholic and his sister, a mother superior in an Indiana convent). 
In addition, Republican rural strength was counted upon to deliver a healthy majority. 

Late in the campaign a confident Blaine returned to New York to nail down his 
expected victory. He first appeared at a meeting of wealthy Republican businessmen 
at Delmonico's Restaurant. The feast was so sumptuous that the New York World pictured 
it as "Belshazzar ' s Feast." As destructive as this annearance was to Blaine's presi- 
dential aspirations, he received a worse setback at a conference with ministers on 
October 29th. During the many tributes to Blaine, Samuel S. Burchard, a Presbyterian 
minister, made a fateful statement. In calling for the defeat of the Democrats, he 
remarked, "We are Republicans, and don't propose to leave our party and identify our- 
selves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism, and rebellion." 
Blaine obviously missed the statement, but a Democratic observer did not. The next 
day Democratic publicists circulated the phrase, "Rum, Romanism, and Rebillion" to the 
Irish wards of New York City. Blaine, though he disavowed the statement, was probably 
defeated by it, as Cleveland carried New York by 1, 149 votes out of 1,167,169 cast. 
Other factors in his defeat in New York were the Prohibitionist St. John's strong show- 
ing of 25,000 votes, Mugwumps defections, the weak showing of the normally Democratic 
Benjamin Butler, and a heavy rain in upstate New York keeping the Republican rural 
vote down. 

It was a strange ending to a strange campaign. Cleveland had squeaked out a 
narrow electoral vote victory of 219 to 182 and had become the first Democrat to occupy 
the White House since James Buchanan. Party issues such as tariff revision, control 
of monopolies, currency problems and civil service were lost in the tumult of personal 
controversy. Perhaps the best summation of voter attitude came from a remark attri- 
buted to a Mugwump leader, Moorfield Storey, "We are told Mr. Blaine has been delin- 
quent on office but blameless in private life, while Mr. Cleveland has been a model 
of official integrity but culpable in his personal relations. We should therefore 
elect Mr. Cleveland to the public office which he is so well qualified to fill, and 
remand Mr. Blaine to the private station which he is admirably fitted to adorn." 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 7 - SPRING 1972 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 8 - SPRING 1972 



PAPER AND CLOTH ITEMS FROM THE 1884 CAMPAIGN 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 9 - SPRING 1972 



POSTERS, KERCHIEFS, RIBBONS, PAMPHLETS AND AD CARDS FROM THE 1884 CAMPAIGN . 




POLITICAL TOKENS, CALENDAR MEDALS, GLASS, CHINA, PAPER WEICHTS , 

WOODEN PLAQUES AND CLOTHING BUTTONS FROM THE 1884 CAMPAIGN. 




BRUMMAGEM* 



♦Brummagem (brum'ajem), noun. A showy but inferior and worthless thing. 





A WARNING TO ALL COLLECTORS OF BRYAN MONEY , by Elmer A. Piercy #19 

The writer has recently been offered, by a dealer in Buffalo, New York, two so-called 
Bryan dollars which he listed as Kreigman No. 205-B and which are copies of Zerbe 
No. 5 silver pieces. These are very crudely made copies. They seemingly have been 
cast in a white metal, much lighter in weight than silver, the pieces show sand pits 
and other flaws as can be seen in the pictures. The words are dull and ragged and 
the edges are not sharp due to there being cast and no stamped. An original piece 
in silver is a beautiful coin type piece, is much heavier and somewhat larger than 
the fakes. Do not be taken in. 




Pictured are three watch fobs being offered at $1.25 each in silver or bronze finish, 
by a Marietta Ohio Distributing Company, The one in the center has not appeared often 
but the other two are offered at many flea markets and even by some dealers of Political 
Americana. Remember, there are authentic ones, so be careful in purchasing. 



APIC KEYNOTER - 



Page 12 



- SPRING 1972 



SATIRE IN POLITICS 
by Robert 0. Lowe, #174 

Among the more interesting items generated by political campaigns are the 
satirical pieces. These range from the biting presentations to the mildly humorous 
innuendo. Over the years, these have taken the form of paper goods, pins, tokens 
and 3-D material. From the very beginning of the Republic, those in high places have 
been subjected to attacks during campaigns or during their term of office. 

Even George Washington did not escape this kind of treatment. In 1794, when 
President Washington was putting down the "Whiskey Rebellion," no less a friend than 
Tom Paine had this to say: "As to you, Sir (Washington), treacherous in private 
friendship (for so you have been to me, and that in the day of danger) and a hypocrite 
in public life, the world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or 
an imposter, whether you have abandoned good principles or whether you ever had any." 
During the campaign of 1804, Thomas Jefferson was ridiculed for both his purchase of 
Louisiana and the gunboats he had built as protection against Spanish depredations 
in the Mississippi River area. In the area of Savannah, a most devastating cyclone 
occurred which leveled houses, deluged land, smashed ships, and created great havoc. 
One of Jefferson's gunboats in the area was found stranded in a corn field when the 
storm subsided. Consequently, a guest at a political dinner proposed a toast: "If 
our gunboats are of no use upon the water, may they at least be useful upon the land." 

From my own collection, the oldest satirical item is a color broadside depicting 
Andrew Jackson with six coffins on his back. This item has reference to the six 
Tennessee militiamen which General Jackson executed in January 1815 for "exciting and 
causing a mutiny." Because of slow communications during that era, the six men were 
executed nearly a month after the war was ended. This broadside was issued coinci- 
dentally with the coffin handbills described on page 219 of Volume I, "American 
Heritage Pictorial History of the Presidents." The other two characters on Jackson's 
back, along with the coffins, are Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams. This piece is 
from the 1828 campaign. Jackson was also dubbed King Andrew I and pictured as trampling 
the Constitution underfoot. 




During the period from the Jackson era until the Civil War, many attacks were 
made against candidates. The advent of such developments as the Panic of 1837 produced 
a sizable group of "Hard Times Tokens" issued for the 1830 Congressional elections. 
These called for Webster currency, with Van Buren w ho supported the Jackson anti-U.S. 
Bank policy as being on the rocks. The 1834 tokens had depicted Jackson with a sword 
and money bag in his hand and with a donkey and LLD. These tokens are quite inexpen- 
sive and add flavor to your collection. An anti-Van Buren shank-back button depicted 
a man in a stovepipe hat thumbing his nose and "You can't come it, Matty — Mar. 1841." 
The expansion of slavery, Oregon Controversy ("Fifty-four Forty or Fight"), Texas 
annexation (1845), Mexican War (1846-47), admission of California (1850), and the 
opening of the West caused many broadsides, pamphlets, ribbons, and magazine cartoons 
to appear. One of the most interesting sources of cartoons is the magazine "Punch" 
for this period. 

APIC KEYNOTER - Page 13 - SPRING 1972 



Recent publications have shown a much more balanced view of the Civil War period 
regarding the vituperation to which Lincoln was subjected. Campaign documents were 
especially caustic in their portrayal of most candidates. Union Campaign Document #7 
from the 1864 contest vilified Ohio Congressman Clement L. Vallandigham as a traitor 
because of his sympathy for ending the war without assurance of reuniting the country. 
Harper's Weekly magazine during the 1860's provided many cartoons which were critical 
of both sides in the political contest. Hundreds of broadsides were issued by 
Currier and Ives during this period, which dealt with the issues of the various 
campaigns. President Andrew Johnson came in for a tremendous amount of ridicule due 
to his humane approach to the Southern states after the conclusion of the Civil War. 

Campaigns during the 70' s and early 80' s produced many paper items which are 
interesting. Especially are those dealing with the "stolen" election of 1876. A 
number of books were published reviewing this celebrated contest, including "The 
Hayes-Tilden Disputed Presidential Election of 1876" by Paul Haworth in 1908. In 
1878, the investigation of alleged electoral frauds was still in progress as illus- 
trated by the pamphlet titled "Investigation of Electoral Frauds" by Clarkson N. 
Potter. This basically was an endeavor to investigate the Louisiana and Florida 
role in the 1876 election. In 1876, the Democratic Party was depicted on tokens as 
having died of Tildenpathy - Shammy Tilden, and Let It - R.I. P. (rest in peace). 




Probably one of the most vitriolic campaigns was that of 1884. During this 
campaign the charge that Grover Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate son was spread 
by pamphlets, broadsides, and cartoons. In a pamphlet titled "Tell the Truth" appears 
this statement: "A prominent gentleman who has for many years known Mr. Cleveland 
well - testifies that he has frequently seen him drunk - and has a reputation among 
his companions of being a lecherous fellow." The other side did not fare well either. 
The famous "Mulligan Letters" dealt with the supposed shady financial transactions 
between James G. Blaine and Mr. Warren Fisher of the Little Rock and Fort Smith 
Railroad. The letters fell into the hands of a clerk named Mulligan, who worked for 
Mr. Fisher. Mulligan "loaned" them to Blaine, but Blaine refused to give them back 
on the grounds that Mulligan had no right to them. They were used with great impact 
in 1884. 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 14 - SPRING 1972 




Among the interesting items for 1888 was a ticket for a trip up Salt River with 
"that old Free Trade Cobden Club Commander, Grover Cleveland." Trips up "Salt River" 
were common before and during this period. In much later campaigns, the same phrase 
was used but its significance has been lost on most voters. According to "A Dictionary 
of American Politics" by Edward C. Smith, published in 1924, "Salt River, the supposed 
destination of a defeated party or candidate. The Salt River, a crooked and almost 
unnavigable stream in Kentucky, was, early in the nineteenth century, a nest of pirates 
who preyed on the commerce of the Ohio River. Goods which "went up Salt River" never 
returned to their owners. Similarly, any party which goes up Salt River is supposed 
never to return." On this particular card, it is interesting to note that Belva 
Lockwood (the second female candidate for President) is listed as chambermaid. 



The Plumed Knight's Funeral 

1884. 

Ha* 

III 



PALL BEARERS. 
?ojm A. BtaeJljaek, Jay Telftgrauhpolft and John L Ravenjiort. 
UNDERTAKERS. 
Saint Water, Bella Woodcock and H. W. ProaofcOT, 




Grower's Funeral Maxell. 

' ' : wm,mrmsm 6, im. 

Hi! JU ' 




tNST**0 OF BANDANNA*. 

MLt UKAttBWh-IIU!* Iirv.1 I. I. ft CHMMjV. LAI kH 

\. v rutxu ut w. h. haskvu. ti*s i.jimiot. 

I HIhr MUVKXKK nit S.CBI U-r X'Wts 



The opposition candidates also were depicted as having died on election day and 
the funeral procession including some of the chief supporters or chief issues and 
also the minor party candidates as having added to their defeat. 

Beginning in 1872 and used in several other campaigns until 1908 were watch 
chain "charms" in the form of a small metal pig (about 1" x 1/2") with a picture of 
the "opposition" candidate visible when looking through the pig's rear end - the 

answer to the cry, "Our next President - in a pig's . " Poor Grover Cleveland 

really had a tough time - he was depicted as a pig pin cushion (see photo) , also a 
metaphoric paper item of four pigs, which when folded four times gave a good likeness 
of him (see photo) , a small pin back shell-type item of a "hussy" with hands held in 
prayer and with a frill skirt with "SUGAR TRUST D0N ! 'T EXPOSE ME, 1 ' and when the sKirt 
is raised you see Grover depicted in a crouching position (see photos). 






■n 



Is 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 15 - SPRING 1972 



Many other candidates were treated to this kind of detraction in other campaigns. 
Satire reached a high point in 1896 with the "Bryan Dollars." These were used 
primarily in the 1896 campaign when basically the Democrats (Bryan) demanded free and 
unlimited coinage of silver with the ratio of 16 ounces of silver to 1 ounce of gold. 
Since the value of silver, measured in terms of gold, was less than 16 to 1, the 
effect of the policy would have been to cheapen the currency. The oversized "Bryan 
Dollars" illustrated how large a "silver" dollar would be compared to "gold" dollars. 
Even though the ratio was not exact, it did make the point. 

Prior to the advent of campaign pins as now used, the derogatory items were mostly 
paper, with a few 3-D items and, infrequently, tokens included. Two innovations 
changed the cost of making such items available to a much larger segment of the voters. 
These two developments were the celluloid campaign button and the illustrated post 
card. Oddly, not many satirical pins were issued until well into the 1920 's. A few 
were used in the 1896 campaign dealing with the 16 to 1 issue, but very few were used 
in attacks on candidates personally. 

Because illustrated post cards were cheap to make and distribute, they were used 
in greater quantity. One such item shows William J. Bryan's face on a clock and the 
legend "The Nebraska Cuckoo Clock. Will run every four years if properly wound." 
This was used in the 1908 campaign. Down to the present, post cards in support of a 
candidate as well as against the candidate have enjoyed great popularity. 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 16 - SPRING 1972 



SATIRE IN POLITICS, continued. 



The 1928 campaign produced a number of campaign pieces which were designed to defeat 
Al Smith. At least three varieties of celluloid pins reading "Anti-Smith" were issued. 
These could be interpreted as anti-wet pins or anti-Catholic. Most voters thought of 
them as the latter. This was also the year of the whispering campaign. Most of this 
material was either handwritten or typewritten. Included was the number 3909-3HT, which 
when viewed backward read "THE POPE." Another scurrilous bit of doggerel was the 
following : 

"When cotton grows on fig trees, 
And apples hang from the rose, 
When Catholics rule the United States 
And the Jew grows a straight nose, 
When Pope Pius is head of the Klu Klux Klan 
In the land of Uncle Sam, 
Then Al Smith will be President 
And the country won't be worth a damn." 

This item was typed and passed from person to person. 

During the Franklin Roosevelt era, there were, of course, hundreds of so-called 
slogan pins in the 1940 campaign. Those against Roosevelt and a third term greatly 
outnumbered those against Willkie. Among the anti-Willkie items were "Better a 
third termer than a third rater," and "Willkie for President of Commonwealth and 
Southern." One of the earliest and most interesting slogan pins was probably used 
in the 1936 campaign. It was an inch celluloid with a white background with blue 
lettering reading "6,000,000 Piglets Squeal 'Hank Wallace's raw deal." This dealt 
with Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace's decision in August 1933 to slaughter 
5 or 6 million pigs to help maintain a hog market. In his book "New Frontiers," 
published in 1934, Wallace discusses this operation on pages 179-81. A wide variety 
of paper items also were used by each candidate during this period. 

Campaigns during the 1950 's brought relatively few derogatory pins, but paper 
goods flourished. In 1952, a small pamphlet titled "Red Record of Adlai Stevenson - 
Stalin's choice for President" was published along with a pin spelled "ADIAi," ADA 
referring to Americans for Democratic Action, a progressive group. Probably few men 
have been as well liked as Dwight Eisenhower, but even he did not escape the usual 
campaign slurs. During the 1956 campaign, a small broadside (8" x 5") appeared which 
read in part - "Public Sale - As we are leaving the White House in the near future, 
will sell the following at auction: 

1 Eisenhower manure spreader (used 4 years) 
1 Nixon fertilizer attachment (good) 
1 Dulles mowing machine (Dulles hell) 
Several sets price supports (slightly used) 

Mr. Nixon will sell one used phonograph and some used records such as 
'It's All Over Now 1 and 'California, Here I Come. 1 



Ike& Mamie, Owners 

Col. Wallstreet - Auct." 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 17 - SPRING 1972 



The 1960 campaign once again raised the religious question and pamphlets 
appeared against John Kennedy. Among them were: "Homo Sapiens vs. Irish - The 
Simian Usurpation of the Presidency" by "Professor Wisdom." Pins reading "Don't 
Send a Boy — " also appeared as anti-Kennedy items, although the age difference 
between Kennedy and Nixon was slight (1917 vs. 1913 respectively). Another read, 
"I'm Voting for Nixon - No Give-Aways - Remember Yalta? - No Apologies - Remember 
the Summit? - No Pie in the Sky - Remember it's Your Money Jack Will Play Poker 
With." Nixon also was subjected to "Would you buy a used car from this man?" and pins 
such as "I Don't Want Nixon," etc. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. wrote a most interesting 
thin book for this campaign titled "Kennedy or Nixon: Does it make any difference?" 
Incidentally, Mr. Schlesinger found that it did make a difference. 

Another banner year for slogan pins was 1964. One of the most involved was a 
3-1/2" gold background pin with a tree outlined and black lettering reading "The 
Democratic Lyndon tree - It needs GOLDWATER." The trunk is labeled "USA" and various 
roots lead to "Billy Estes," "High Government Spending," "Forgotten Constitution," 
"Foreign Failures," "Cuba," "Viet Nam," "Racial Violence," and "Bobby Baker." An under- 
standing of this one pin presents nearly all the issues used against Lyndon Johnson. 
Because of Seantor Goldwater's wide use of the chemical symbols for gold (Au) and water 
(H 2 0), a rather uncouth pin reading "C5H4N4O3 on AuH 2 0" was distributed. Basically, 
this says urinate on Goldwater, but usually a more colloquial term was used. Not to 
be outdone, a pin received limited distribution reading, "All the way with LBJ but don't 
go near the YMCA." This had reference to the Walter Jenkins affair which occurred 
during the campaign. It is interesting to note that two or three designs of pins 
reading "Kennedy for King Goldwater for President" appeared prior to the assassina- 
tion of President Kennedy. Bumper strips reading, "Let's retire the Kennedy's in '64" 
also appeared with three rocking chairs labeled "His," "Bobby," "Teddv." So much variety 
of satirical material appeared in this campaign that a separate collection might be 
made. 

Perhaps because no incumbent was seeking office, the 1968 race produced surprisingly 
little real scurrilous material. The pin depicting Senator Humphry with a millstone 
around his neck labeled "LBJ" may be classed as derogatory. Probably the best known 
Nixon item of this category is that of an obviously pregnant young ladv saying, "Nixon 
is the one." More telling, however, is undoubtedly the poster of a black lady with 
the same legend. "Dump the Hump" and "Nix on Nixon" were also favorites in pins and 
bumper stickers. 

As we prepare for 1972, there have already been items of interest in this category 
of material. There are pins and bumper strips circulating which read, "Nixon for 
President - of Red China" and "Don't Forget Chappaquiddick. " Undoubtedly, much more 
will follow. 

Because of the wealth of material which has been distributed of a satirical nature, 
we have not been able to cover all the items. Such things as the Harding nose thumber, 
Teapot Dome pins, the Truman porch, "Clear it With Sidney" pins, and much more are 
passed over. This has been an attempt to whet the search for greater understanding of 
the meanings of the fascinating pieces of Americana in our collections. For me, one 
of the greatest joys of collecting is to be able to explain my things to an inquisitive 
mind. May you also find it so. 





APIC KEYNOTER - Page 1.8 - SPRING 1972 




..Jlf \ ^ jta 

^1 • in 



Vf ' 

Sure - I'm for Roosevelt 



APIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 

THE FIFTH NATIONAL CONVENTION OF THE APIC WILL BE HELD IN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN ON 
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, AUGUST 10-11-12, 1972. THE RED CARPET INN IS THE 
LOCATION, JUST OFF THE INTERSTATE, NEAR THE AIRPORT, A MOST ACCESSABLE LOCATION. 
THE FACILITIES ARE OUTSTANDING AND WE SHOULD HAVE A CONVENTION TO MATCH; FOR THE 
WISCONSIN CHAPTER HAS BEEN WORKING SINCE LAST FALL TO MAKE IT A MEMORABLE EVENT. 
THERE WILL BE PLENTY OF TIME FOR BUYING AND TRADING ALONG WITH EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS 
AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS, FOR THE BEGINNER AND THE ADVANCED COLLECTOR. THERE WILL BE 
ACTIVITIES FOR THE NON-COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY TOO, SO MAKE IT A PART OF THE FAMILY 
VACATION. DON'T MISS IT'. 

APIC CHAPTER NEWS by Fer <* O'Brien, #103 

wr iv vnwr n;i\ hlbo r 1355 N Sandburg Xr>> chicago> 60610 

NEW TEXAS CHAPTER FORMED 

Congratulations to John Ben Sheppard, #1544, upon the formation of our latest 
APIC chapter. The chapter in Odessa, Texas will meet at "The Presidential Museum" 
of the Ector County Library. The first meeting is scheduled for Saturday, June 17, 
and will be in conjunction with the official opening of a large exhibit which will be 
displayed through the November election. All Texas collectors are asked to share a 
part of their collection for a special display to be set up in a building across 
the street from The Presidential Museum. Local and state items will be welcomed and 
the display will also run until election. We look forward to big things from the 
big state of Texas. 

GATEWAY-TO-THE-WEST CHAPTER 

The winter meeting of the St. Louis Chapter was held February 11 at Farm & 
Home Savings & Loan in Webster Groves. Our 1972 officers are Warren Lee, re-elected 
President; George McGrath, re-elected Vice President; Leonard Hyman, re-elected 
Sergeant at Arms; and Ernest Urech is our new Secretary- Treasurer . Thanks to 
John Mayne for a fine job as Secretary- Treasurer. It was Stevenson night and many 
fine Stevenson items were on display. Chick Harris presented many slides, taken 
over the years at various APIC conventions and meetings, and of displays of the 
DeWitt, Joe Brown and other fine collections. The next meeting will be held Friday, 
May 12, and all are invited. Plans have been finalized to sponsor a one-day swap 
and sell session on Saturday, June 24, at the Bohemian Savings & Loan Building, 
Morganford and Gravois Avenues, in South St. Louis. The doors will open at 10:00 
and all are invited. Contact Ernest M. Urich, Box 85, St. Charles, Missouri 63301 
for further details. 



GREATER CHICAGO APIC CHAPTER 

The winter meeting of the Greater Chicago Chapter was held January 30, 1972. 
Several members of the chapter who are helping with plans for the National Convention 
in Milwaukee asked for suggestions and gave a report. The spring meeting will be 
held at 1:00 p.m. on April 30 at the Second Presbyterian Church, 2000 South Michigan 
Avenue. There will be election of officers, consideration of chapter by-laws, 
proposal of joint meetings, and report of latest National Convention plans. All 
are invited to a fine afternoon of buying, selling and trading. 

LeRoy Blommaert, Chapter Secretary-Treasurer 

OHIO CHAPTER MEETING. 

The Ohio Chapter will hold its spring meeting at the Sheraton Inn East, near 
Mentor Ohio (190 and Ohio 306) just east of Cleveland, on Saturday, April 29, 1972. 
There will be registration Friday Evening and then room hopping. Saturday morning 
bourse plus a tour of President Garfield's home near Mentor, to be followed by an 
auction and afternoon bourse. Al Anderson, OPIC President looks forward to seeing 
many mid-west Apicers enjoying the day with the Ohio Chapter. 

Jerry Wildenhaus, Chapter Secy-Treas. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page /? - SPRING 1972 



AjPIC CHAPTER NEWS, continued, 



WI SCONSIN CHAPTER MEET IN Q 

The spring meeting of the Wisconsin chapter took place on Sunday, April 9 at 
the offices of the Associated Life Insurance Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Joe 
Brown was the host. President Ivan Imm presided. A committee reporting on chapter 
dues was heard and it was decided to have dues of $1.00 per year for those wishing 
the right to attend and participate in the bourse as well as receive notices of the 
wets. Toting rights, however, will be extended only to Wisconsin members . Joe Brown 
then discussed the convention plans. Things are going along well and we of Wisconsin 
intend this to be not only one of the finest the APIC has ever had, but a model for 
all future conventions. The site offers all the modern facilities. >fe of Wisconsin 
are offering all you some of our very friendly "gemutlichkeit." Introduced, among 
our membership, are two delegates to a National nominating convention. They are Joe 
Brown who will be a delegate at the Republican Convention and Tom Kitchen who is a 
McOovern delegate to the Democratic Convention. The fall chapter meeting will be 
held in Madison. A nominating committee of Ivan Imm, Jim Watson and Elmer Koppelmann 
was appointed and the topic for the meeting, 1972 AUTHENTIC pins, was approved. 
Jim Watson of the Wisconsin Historical Society appealed for some presidential 3-D 
materials to be used for an election exhibit of that group. The items will be returned 
when the display is over. A fine group of about $0 enjoyed the buying, selling, 
swapping and just plain socializing. 

Jack Put man, Chapter Secretary 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA APIC CHAPTER 

The Northern California Chapter held its meeting on February 20, 1972. The 
meeting was held in the Eastridge Shopping Center in San Jose. The meeting was called 
to order by President Ron Smith. A discussion occurred over the frequency of our 
meetings. It was decided that quarterly meetings were preferable. The next meeting 
will occur in the spring and is to be coordinated by Tice President John Larsen. 

Melvin Panizza, Secretary-Treasurer 

EMPIRE CHAPTER APIC MEETING 

The Empire Chapter meeting to be held on Saturday May 6, 1972 at the First United 
Methodist Church in Cortland, New York, from ten to four, is billed as a da with 
Alton B. Parker. There will be a visit to Parkers birthplace just outside Cortland and 
a talk by Webster T. Haven. Special displays of members' Parker buttons as well as a 
special display by the Cortland County Historical Society, will be featured. The welcome 
mat is out . 

Bob Lowe, Chapter President 



CONNECTICUT APIC'S ANNUAL TWO-DAT MEETING 

On Friday and Saturday, April 28 and 29, the Connecticut Chapter of the APIC will 
present the largest 1972 APIC meeting east of the Mississippi and south of Lake 
Michigan at the Holiday Inn in Meriden, Connecticut. There will be a two-day bourse, 
program, banquet, exhibit and auction sessions, and many of the APIC officers from 
across the country have expressed their intent to be with us. The response from 
dealers, publishers and hobby notables has been equally gratifying and a truly banner 
turnout is assured. We'd like to see TOU, too, sharing in the fun and excitement. 
We're sure you'll agree the program offers something for everyone. 

Bob Carter, Chapter Secretary 

LEWIS & CLARK CHAPTER 

The Lewis & Clark Chapter met December 11 in Portland, Oregon. Chapter President 
Stephen Bibler reported on current headquarter buttons. Each member then told of 
their collections and of their recent additions. Fred Thompson gave a talk on his 
trip to the Republican Convention in Chicago in I960 and the great fun and thrill of 
attending a political party convention. Members were urged to support the Halpern Bill 
currently in Congress, which would require that the year of manufacture be identified 
on all antique and hobby reproductions. 

Wanda Crockett, Acting Chapter Secretary 
APIC KEYNOTER - Page Zo - SPRING 1972 



iommentary. *».c_ . . «~^c_«,, 

THIS is the year we've been waiting for! After you've had that display in 
the school, library, museum, bank or store. . .after you've been written up in the 
papers. . .after you've copped that award, drop us a line or a clipping and we'll 
see that your fellow APIC'ers hear the news. 

Speaking of write-ups, Ed Sullivan (#264) received splendid coverage in the 
Waterbury (Conn.) Republican. Starting with the full color picture on the front 
cover of the magazine section, the article dealt with the University of Hartford's 
display of the DeWitt collection. One of the headlines sums up the gist of the 
story: "Political Memorabilia Attains Academic Stature." 

Thanks to Fred Thompson (#2555) for forwarding an article from California's 
Valley News showing a write-up and photograph of Craig Bell (#1726) and his fine 
collection. Good going, Craig. 

APIC Commentary sautes. . .Victor and Sally Luscomb (#216) on their fiftieth 
wedding anniversary on May 1st. . .the New York Times Magazine Section of March 26 
for its excellent article on Warren Harding, a man being re-evaluated and upgraded 
by historians. . .the soon-to-be-APIC'er who types this slogan on his envelopes: 
"Freedom is fragile. Handle with prayer." 

Jerry D. Roe, #501, an APIC Director, has bben appointed to the Michigan Historial 
Commission by Governor William G. Milliken. Congratul ations . Jerry . 

Elmer Piercy, #19, sends a brochure telling us about a new museum in San Deigo. 
Its Joe McGee 's American Presidents Museum and is located at 2476 San Deigo Avenue in 
Old Town. Campaign items from GW to the present are featured. 

Philip N. Tilden, #754, received a nice write-up about his collection in the 
February 8 issue of the Sun Telegram. Phil was pictured along with a portion of his 
collection. 

On Tuesday May 2, 1972 an exhibition, "IF ELECTED", premiers at the National 
Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC. The display featuring the Unsuccessful Candid- 
ates for President-1996 to 1968, will run thru November and is sponsored by the Smith- 
Steve Russell, #1723, sends another photo of a NIXON display he prepared for his 
classroom at the Monangahela, Pennsylvania High School. He has every Time cover to 
feature Nixon. 

Send us a card, letter or clipping. Keep us posted on you. It will be impossible 
to reply to all but we will let your fellow h&bbiests know via this column. 




APIC KEYNOTER - Page 2/ - SPRING 1972 



CANDIDATES 1972 
A Selected list of Published and Forthcoming Books 



The following bibliography is derived from listings found in Publishers 
weekly , Cumulative book index and Books in print . It includes only those 
items currently available in bookstores. 

The titles, publication dates and prices of the forthcoming books (des- 
ignated by month of publication) are subject to change. 

This is a partial list— it is by no means complete. No doubt, between 
now and November 7th many other books on this subject will be made available. 



ADLER, BILL, comp. Kids letters to Spiro Agnew . New York; Bernard Geis, 
1971. $3.95. 

AGNEW, SPIRO T. Collected speeches of Spiro Agnew . New York: Audubon 
Books, 1971. $.95. 

ALBRIGHT, JOSEPH. What makes Spiro run ? The life and times of Spiro T. 
Agnew . New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., April"l972. $6.95. 

ALLEN, GARY. Richard Nixon i the man behind the mask . Boston: Western 
Islands, 1971. $8.00. 

ANSON, ROBERT. Biography of George McGovern . New York: Holt, Rinehart & 
Winston, March 1972. ~$6.95. (According to Senator McGovern, this is 
the authorized biography.) 

BARONE, MICHAEL. The almanac of American politics— 1972 . New York: 
Gambit, 1972.~T3795^ Ta wealth of political material.) 

BRUNO, JERRY and JEFF GREENFIELD. The advance man . New York: William 
Morrow & Co., 1971. $5.95. New York: Bantam Books, 1972. $1.25. 
(At head of title: "Will Lindsay beat Nixon in 19727") 

CANNON, LOU. The McCloskey challenge . New York: E.P. Dutton & Co.. 1972. 
$5.95. 

CHISHOLM SHIRLEY. Unbought and unbossed. New York: Avon Books, 1971. $.95. 

CONGRESSIONAL QUARTERLY. Candidates '72 . Washington, D.C.: Congressional 
Quarterly, Inc., 19717 $3.00. Jk must for every voter.) 

COYNE, JOHN R. Impudent snobs : Agnew vs. the intellectual establishment . 
New Rochelle, New York: Arlington House, 1972. 

DAVID, LESTER. Ted Kennedy : triumphs and tragedies . New York: Grosset & 
Dunlap, April 19721 $7.95. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 22 - SPRING 1972 



CURRENT PUBLICATIONS - CANDIDATES '72, continued. 



DRURY, ALLEN, Courage and hesitation ! notes and photographs of the Nixon 
administration . New York: Doubleday & Co., 1971. $12.50. 

EISELE, ALBERT. Almost to the Presidency . Blue Earth, Minnesota: Piper 

Co., March 1972. $10.00. (A study of Senators Humphrey and McCarthy.) 

EVANS, ROWLAND, JR. and ROBERT D. NOVAK. Nixon in the White House : the 
frustration of power . New York: Random House, 1971^ $8.95* 

GARDNER, GERALD. Everything you always wanted to know about Nixon but were 

afraid to ask . Greenwich, Connecticut: Fawcett Publications, 1971~ $.75 • 

GREGORY, DICK. Dick Gregory's election handbook : for 1972 and beyond . New 
York: Harper & Row, 1972. $5.95* (A unique guide by a former and per- 
haps future candidate.) 

HARRIS, FRED R. Now is the time ; a Populist call to action . New York: 
McGraw Hill Book Co., 1971. ?6.95. 

HERSH, BURTON. The education of Edward Kennedy . New York: William Morrow & 
Co., May 1972. $10.95. 

HOFFMAN, PAUL. The new Nixon . New York: Tower Publications, 1970. $.95. 

. Spirol New York: Tower Publications, 1971. $.95. 

HONAN, WILLIAM H. Ted Kennedy ; profile of a survivor . Chicago: Quadrangle 
Books, April 1972. $6.95. 

H0PPE, ARTHUR. Mr. Nixon and my other problems . San Francisco: Chronicle 
Books, 1971. $6.95. 

KENNEDY, EDWARD M. In critical condition ; the crisis in American health care . 
New York: Simon & Schuster, June 1972. $6.95. 

KE0GH, JAMES. President Nixon and the press . New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 
April 19721 $6.95. 

LEEK, SYBIL. Astrological guide to the Presidential candidates . New York: 
Abelard-Schuman, April 1972. $1.25. 

LIPPMAN, THE0, JR. Spiro Agnew's America ; the Vice -President and the politics 
of suburbia . New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1972^ $7.95. 

and DONALD C. HANSEN. Muskie . New York: W.W. Norton & 
Co., 1971. $6.95. 

McCLOSKEY, PAUL N., JR. Truth and untruth : political deceit in America . 
New York: Simon & Schuster, 197211 $2. 95. 

McGOVERN, GEORGE. The great Coalfield War . Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 
May 1972. $5.95. 

MARSH, ROBERT. Agnew, the unexamined man ; a political profile . New York: 
M. Evans & Co., 1971. $5.95. 

MAZLISH, BRUCE. In search of Nixon : a psychohistorical inquiry . New York: 
Basic Books, April 1972. $6.95. 

APIC KEYNOTER - Page 23 - SPRING 1972 



MUSKIE, EDMUND S. The unfinished .journey . New York: Doubleday & Co., May 
1972. $6.95. 

NAPOLITAN, JOSEPH. The election game— and how to win it. New York: Double- 
day & Co., April 1972^ |ST95^ (Suggestions on how to defeat President 
Nixon . ) 

NEVIN, DAVID. Muskie of Maine . New York: Random House, 1972. $6.95. 

OLSEN, JACK. The bridge at Chappaquiddick . New York: Ace Publishing Corp., 

1970. $1.25. 

OSBORNE, JOHN. The Nixon watch . New York: Liveright, 1971. $^.95. 

. The second year of the Nixon watch . New York: Liveright, 

1971. $^.95. 

PAULSEN, PAT. How to wage a successful campaign for the Presidency . Los 
Angeles: Nash Publishing Corp., May 1972. $5795. 

PROCHNAU, WILLIAM W. and RICHARD W. LARSEN. A certain Democrat . Senator 

Henry W. Jackson ; a political biography . Englewood Cliffs , New Jersey: 
Prentice-Hall, 1972. $6.95. 

ROTH, PHILIP. Our gang . ( Starring Tricky and his friends .) New York: Ran- 
dom House, 1971. $5.95. New York: Bantam Books, May 1972. $1.50. 
(The controversial best selling novel about the Nixon administration.) 

RUST, ZAD. Teddy Bare ; the last of the Kennedy clan . Boston: Western 

Islands, 1971. $7. 00. (An extremely critical study of the Massachusetts 
senator.) 

SEELE, GLORIA WALLS. The Pat Nixon story . New York: Prentice-Hall, 1972. 
$6.95. 

SILK, LEONARD. Nixonomics . New York: Pantheon Books, May 1972. $5»95» 

SPALDING, HENRY D. The Nixon nobody knows . Middle Village, New York: 
Jonathan David Publications, Summer 1972. $7.95* 

VAN DOREN, RONALD. Charting the candidates '72 . New York: Pinnacle Books, 

1972. $1.25. 

VIDAL, GORE. An evening with Richard Nixon . New York: Random House, 1972. 
$4.95. 

WHALEN , RICHARD. Catch the falling flag . Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 
May 1972. No price available. (A critical look at Richard Nixon.) 

WILLS, GARRY. Nixon Agonistes ; the crisis of the self-made man . New York: 
New American Library, 1971. $1.50. 

WITCOVER, JULES. White knight : the rise of Spiro Agnew . New York: Random 
House, 1972. $10.00. 

WOODSTOhE, ART. Nixon ' s head . New York: Coward, McCann and Geoghegan, 
1972. $6.95. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 2f - SPRING 1972 



NO CROWN OF THORNS - NO CROSS OF GOLD, by Elmer Piercy, APIC #19 



It is always of Interest to see the slogans and phrases developed during a political 
campaign. Many are clever and many are derogatory. Some are a play on words and 
others a play on names. There has never been a campaign without them and there will 
never be. Although many have been used since the early 1800's, the ones the writer 
has especially liked, have been those used during the campaign of 1896. Let us examine 
one of several the Democratic party used during that time and see how it was developed. 

On July 9, 1896, while addressing the Democratic convention in Chicago, William J. 
Bryan, a hopeful at that moment, closed his address with the following lines, "Therefore, 
we care not upon what lines the battle is fought. If they say Bimetallism is good, 
but that we cannot have it until other nations help us, we reply that, instead of having 
a gold standard because England has, we will restore bimetallism and then let England 
have bimetallism because the United States has it. If they dare to come out in the 
open field and defend the gold standard as a good thing, we will fight them to the 
utmost. Having behind us the producing masses of this nation and the world, supported 
by the commercial interests, the laboring interests and the toilers everywhere, we 
will answer their demands for a gold standard by saying to them: 'YOU SHALL NOT PRESS 
DOWN UPON THE BROW OF LABOR THIS CROWN OF THORNS; YOU SHALL NOT CRUCIFY MANKIND UPON 
A CROSS OF GOLD 1 ." With this speech Bryan won the nomination and the battle of 
bimetallism was joined. The definition of bimetallism is given as, "the legalized 
concurrent use of a double metallic standard, as gold and silver, in the coinage or 
currency of a country, at a fixed ration of value, also the doctrine advocating such 
use, as opposed to monometallism." 

Bryan campaigned on a 16 to 1 ratio of silver to gold and many were the slogans used 
on banners, tokens, badges,- medals, buttons, ribbons and the then new celluloids, all 
carrying this message to the voters. Fewer were the ones making use of the words from 
his speech quoting the cross of gold and the crown of thorns, but some very attractive 
buttons and pins were manufactured and circulated. Pictured here are those the writer 
has been fortunate in finding during the past fifteen years. 



©RYAN 



THE HANDSOHEST 

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APIC KEYNOTER - Page tS- SPRING 1972 




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NO CROWN OF THORNS - NO CROSS OF GOLD, concluded . 



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A satarical cartoon, referring to the hundreds of An artist's sketch of Bryan delivering his 

campaign speeches which Bryan was delivering. famous 'Cross of Gold' spepch in Chicago. 



ABIC KEYNOTER - Bage £4- spring 1972 



1972 THIRD PARTY NEWS 

By Jon D. Curtis 

Following is a listing of material available from third 
parties as of March 31, 1972. Also listed with each party is 
their last available address that I have been able to find. 
Perhaps you may have better luck, in some cases, than I have 
had to date. 

National State's Rights Part y - P.O. Box 1211 , Marietta , Georgia 
" "■"**" 30060 

The NSRP seems to be concentrating on local candidate 
J.B. Stoner. He is running for U. S. Senator. He was the 1964 
NSRP candidate for Vice President. They have issued no buttons. 
They will send their paper, The Thunderbolt . 



Greenback Party - 1522 Northwest 58th St., Seattle, Washington 

No answer and letter returned with forwarding address 
unknown . 

Prohibition Party - Box 2635, Denver, Colorado 80201 

The .Prohibition Party has already selected its 1972 candidates 
E. Harold Munn for President and Marshall Uncapher for Vice Presi- 
dent. They have issued a jugate which was sent with the last 
Keynoter . Note ' The Prohibition Party will be publishing a party 
history later this year at a very reasonable price. It will be 
the first published since 1926. Don't miss the opporturnty to 
pick up this official publication if you are a third party buff. 
It is fitting that this book will be available this year as it 
was just 100 years ago that the Prohibition Party first ran 
national candidates. 

Socialist Labor Party - 116 Nassau St., Brooklyn, New York 11201 

The SLP National Convention will be held April 8 in Detriot, 
Michigan. They probably will have buttons again plus pamphlets 
and copies of the Weekly People available. 

Socialist Party - 1182 Broadway, New York, New York 10001 

They have not nominated candidates since 1956 when Hoopes 
and Friedman ran on the national ticket. The SP now advocates 
working within the Deomcratic Party. 

Socialist W orke rs Party - 14 Charles Lane, New York, New York 
~" 10014 
The SWP has already nominated 30 year-old Linda Jeness for 
President and Andrew Pulley for Vice President. He is 20 years 
old. They have issued both picture buttons of Jeness and Pulley 
and "Make Your First Vote Count" buttons. The SWP has also 
issued several pamphlets and copies of The Militant . They have 
been very active, particularly on the college campuses. If they 
can overcome the ineligibility laws for President, since their 
candidates are under the age required in the Constitution, they 
should easily top their previous vote totals. 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page lj - SPRING 1972 



America First Party - 12053 South Halstead, Chicago, Illinois 



Lar Daly has not responded to my letters. 

Theocratic Party - 2504 Arrow Wood Drive, Huntsville, Alabama 

35803 

The Theocratic Party is supporting President Nixon for 
re-election. They have issued no buttons. 

Universal Party - P.O. Box 516, Berkeley, California 94701 

Kirby Hensley has not responded to my letters. 
Communist Party - 23 West 26th Street, New York, New York 



The Communist Party has nominated long-time General Secretary 
Gus Hall for President and Jarvis Tyner for Vice President. They 
have not responded to my letters, but we are checking out the 
possibility that they have issued a three inch celluloid jugate. 

Constitution Party - Box 52061, Huston, Texas 

Richard Troxell has not responded to my letters. 

Nationa l Socialist Party of America - 2519 West 71st St., Chicago, 
~ Illinois 60629 

Frank Collin is the new party leader. Some printed material 
and anti-Jewish booklets are available. They expect to be 
producing new leaflets and posters in the near future. They do 
not mention an intent to nominate national candidates this year. 

Peoples' Coalition Party - 

I have not found an address for them. They have nominated 
Benjamin Spock and Julius Hobson this year. 

This sums up what I have been able to find out about the 
third parties so far. Before you by buttons for third parties, 
it might be worth it to you to spend eight cents to be sure you 
are getting official buttons. 



SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY CANDIDATES 
The SLP at their Detroit Convention n med the team of Louis Fisher,, a Chicago silk 
spotter in a dry cleaning plant and Genevieve Gunderson, a Minneapolis Fire Depart- 
ment dispatcher, to head their 1972 ticket. Fisher is a 37 year member of the party 
and Gunderson joined in 1935 at the age of 16. 



Back issues of the KEYNOTER will be available at our National Convention in Milwaukee, 
or may be ordered from: APIC MAILINGS, 6319 THOLOZAN, ST. LOUIS, MO. 63109. 

1967 (3 issues only) $2.25 post paid. 

1968 thur 1971 (full years) $3.25 per year, post paid. 

Included with the years, are the var* us APIC projects and special inserts, such as 
Candidates on Ballot-1968; John W. Davis Project, Parker Davis Project, etc 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page v? _ SPRING 1972 



APIC KEYNOTER INDEX 
by Ed Jensen, APIC #905 
(Material covered in KEYNOTERS through pring 1972 issue) 

A - APIC - old KEYNOTERS, pamphlets, etc. - Autumn, '68 

B - Button frames - Autumn, '69 

Brumma gem: '68 legitimate and collectors' buttons for collectors - Spring '70 
Bryan, Win. J. - Autumn '67 
Bull Moose Party - Spring '66 

C - CAMPAIGNS: 



1820 


- 


Autumn 


'67 


1896 




Autumn 


'65 


1824 


- 


Autumn 


'67 


1900 





Summer 


'65 


1828 


- 


Autumn 


•67 


1904 




Autumn 


'66 


1832 




Autumn 


'67 


1908 




Spring 


»65 


1836 




Autumn 


'67 


1912 




Spring 


'66 


1840 




Winter 


'66- '67; Autumn '67 


1916 




Sunnnsr 


'66 


1844 




Winter 


'67- '68 


1920 




Winter 


'66-'67 


1848 




Winter 


'67- '68 


1924 




Spring 


•67 


1852 




Spring 


'68 


1928 




Autumn 


'67 


1856 




Spring 


•68 


1932 




Winter 


•67-'68 


1860 




Winter 


•68- '69 


1936 




Spring 


'69 


1864 




Summer- 


■Autumn '70 


1940 




Autumn 


'69 


1868 




Summer 


'68 


1944 




Spring 


'70 


1872 




Summer 


'69 


1948 




Spring 


'68 


1876 




Winter 


'69- '70 


1952 




Spring 


»71 


1880 




Summer 


'71 


1956 




Autumn-Winter '71 


1884 




Spring 


•72 


1960 




Summer 


'72 


1888 




Winter 


'65- '66 


1964 








1892 




Summer 


'67 


1968 




Autumn 





Care, storage - Summer '66 

Champ Clark - Summer '71 

Collectors making buttons - Spring '70 

Coolidge - Winter '66- '67 

Cox (James M.) - Winter '66- '67 

Crown of thorns; Cross of gold - Spring '72 

Convict (Debs) buttons - Winter '66- '67 

D - Davis (Jefferson) - Summer '71 

Davis (John W.) - Winter '66- '67; Summer-Autumn '70 
Debs (Eugene V.) convict buttons - Winter '66- '67 
Dinner Pail items - Autumn-Winter '71 

E-F - Henry Ford - Spring '67 

Fobs (watch) - Spring '70 

Joe Fuld (APIC #1) - Spring '69 

G - Gold (no cross of) - Spring '72 

H-I - Harding (Warren G.) - Winter '66- '67 

Harrison (W. H.) shanked buttons - Autumn '65 
Hoover (Herbert) - Winter '66- '67 
Insurance coverage - Spring '68 

Institutions with political collections - Summer '69 

I Like Ike slogan - Spring '65 

Index of KEYNOTER material - Spring '72 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page *1 - SPRING 1972 



J - Jefferson Davis - Summer '71 

K - Kin (setting up for them to collect) - Winter '67-' 68 
KEYNOTER Index - Spring '72 

L - Landon (Alfred M.) - Autumn *66 

License plate attachments - Summer-Autumn '70 

La Follette (Robert M.) (Progressives) - Summer-Autumn '70 

M - Mailing, wrapping tips - Spring '67 

McKinley (Wm.) (1896 & 1900) - Summer '71 
McKinley (Wm. ) buttons - Autumn '67 

N - Nicknames (political) - Autumn-Winter '71 

No crown of thorns, no cross of gold - Spring '72 

0 - 

P-Q - Progressives - Summer-Autumn '70 
People's Party - Summer '67 
P. A. terminology - Autumn '65 

Political nicknames - Autumn-Winter '71 & Spring '72 
Political satire - Spring '72 

R - Monroe D. Ray (APIC #3) - Spring '69 
Roosevelt-Truman jugates - Spring '65 
Roosevelt (Teddy) progressives - Summer-Autumn '70 

S - Storage, care of items - Summer '66 
Smith (Al) - Winter '66- '67 
Slogans on buttons - Winter '66- '67 
States (where Presidents) - Winter '66-' 67 
Same names (Nathan Bryan, etc.) - Autumn '67 
Suffrage (woman) - Winter '70-* 71 
Shanked buttons (W. H. Harrison) - Autumn '65 
Satire in politics - Spring '72 

T - Truman (Roosevelt) jugates - Spring '65 
Terminology (hobby) - Summer '65 
Third parties in '72 - Spring '72 
Thorns (no crown of) - Spring '72 

U-V - 

W - Watch fobs - Spring '70 

Woman suffrage - Winter '70- '71 
Women candidates for President - Winter '70- '71 
Washington medals (Geo.) - Summer '65 
Washington Monument - Spring '70 

X-Y-Z - 



APIC KEYNOTER - Page 3a . SPRING 1972